Archive | August, 2013

Building a Traditional Flamenco Guitar

22 Aug

Building a Traditional Flamenco Guitar.

Building a Traditional Flamenco Guitar

22 Aug

Here’s a photo diary of the latest guitar I’m working on.

Materials:

Neck – Honduras Cedar

Soundboard – European Spruce

Body – Spanish Cypress

Head Veneer – European Maple, Indian Rosewood

Rosette – Galilee Olive root, European Maple

Bindings – Galilee Rosewood (Sesam)

Fingerboard and Bridge – Indian Rosewood

Tuning Pegs – English Boxwood

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The Neck

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headmarking

headcarving

heelmarking

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The Rosette

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This is my neighbour’s woodpile. They are lucky enough to have a big pile of olive roots to burn for the winter.

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This is a piece of one of the olive roots.

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On the top left of the picture you can see a small part of that olive root. That was sliced very thin and inlaid into a groove cut in the soundboard.

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Bands of maple are bent and inlaid around the central olive part with thin sycamore veneers to add contrast.

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When the glue is all dry, I plane it down level with the surface of the soundboard.

It looks like this:

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Assembly

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Thickness planing the soundboard to about 2.2mm.

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Measuring the thickness.

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All the parts ready to be assembled. At the bottom you can see the kerfed linings that will hold the guitar together. Above those are the sides. At this stage they’re still flat and have to be bent to shape.

assembly

Photo taken just before the back was glued on

routing

Cutting the channel for the bindings.

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Detail for heel inlay.

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binding

scraping

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back

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Guitar Making Courses

18 Aug

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I am pleased to announce the opening of my new workshop in Kibbutz Yachad, next to Hararit.

It is much larger than my previous workshop, so I am now able to offer guitar making courses for up to 5 people at a time.

Courses are flexible and tailored to the individual as I understand that everyone’s circumstances, time limitations, aims and expectations are different.

As a general rule, however, courses will cover every aspect of guitar making, including:

Design

Selecting Materials

Practical understanding, proper use and care of hand tools

Acoustic theory

Guitar history, evolution and innovation

Guitar making as a career

and lots more…

as well as building your guitar itself.

Guitars will be made and finished using traditional methods, hand tools and natural finishes.

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Courses are open to anyone interested in building their own guitar. No woodworking experience is necessary, though it will be an advantage. No qualifications are necessary. These courses are intentionally hands-on and workshop-based. You won’t be tested on anything. Though it will be challenging at times, it should also be a fun, enlightening and possibly life-changing experience.

Accommodation can be arranged for those wishing to take a residential course.

Please contact me for further details

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Ecological Jazz Guitar. Part 7.

16 Aug

The Scratchplate

Perhaps the most interesting and unusual feature of this guitar (and also the one which caused the most difficult design challenges) is the removable electrified scratchplate.  The idea is that without the scratchplate, the guitar is completely acoustic.  Then by the simple addition of the scratchplate, it becomes electric. All of the components – the volume and tone controls and the jack input are fitted in the small space beneath  the scratchplate. The Kent Armstrong floating Jazz pickup comes out of the side to be suspended underneath the strings.

The whole assembly easily snaps on and off  in a matter of seconds. This is thanks to the clever use of small, extremely strong neodymium magnets which are invisibly concealed inside the guitar’s bindings and in wooden feet on the scratchplate’s copper arms.

The scratchplate itself is made from local Sesam wood.

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The Finished Guitar

Here are some pictures of the finished guitar.

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label
label

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